"a lover of rock-and-roll, a New Yorker, an aesthete, a punk, a sinner, a sometime seeker of enlightenment (and love) (and sex)"

26th July 2014

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Breakfast.

Breakfast.

26th July 2014

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This hasn’t been a very good week.

24th July 2014

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This is the face of someone who:
-buys $10 Mozart opera records on her lunch break
-lives in an apartment way beyond her means
-regularly looks at pictures of dudes in 18th century clothing and thinks about how cool they look
-likes tahini sauce maybe too much
-cries at Janis Joplin songs
-really loves her bike

This is the face of someone who:

-buys $10 Mozart opera records on her lunch break

-lives in an apartment way beyond her means

-regularly looks at pictures of dudes in 18th century clothing and thinks about how cool they look

-likes tahini sauce maybe too much

-cries at Janis Joplin songs

-really loves her bike

Tagged: important things everyone surely wanted to know about me

24th July 2014

Link with 2 notes

Feminism and the "50 Shades" Hangover – The Los Angeles Review... →

What becomes clear, reading these two books together, is that people have been misinterpreting “the personal is political” for about as long as people have been saying it. We’ve mistakenly taken it to mean that if I take care of myself, if I achieve acclaim or money or success, because I am a woman, then that is a political victory. Or, talking about myself and sharing my story is a political act.

….

The civil rights and feminist movements did something remarkable: they dismantled the hierarchy that had ruled society for centuries. The stakes of this…are tremendous. It’s an incomplete job, of course, but with every generation of white boys not raised to believe they have dominion over everyone else, and every generation of everyone else who are raised to believe they do not have to be subservient, the hierarchy will fade into history.

But something has to replace the hierarchy. What we’ve chosen as a replacement, it seems, is a not-dissimilar power dynamic. If everyone is equal, and the playing field is (theoretically) level, then the only thing keeping you from your success is yourself. ….

There are obvious problems with this set-up, and it’s questionable whether this actually counts as “progress” or is maybe not simply a reshuffling of the same old deck. Even if gender isn’t necessarily the determinative factor, there’s still the powerful and the powerless. What these books help us see is that once you get into this mindset, focused on the acquisition of power, the people around you are less likely to look like human beings and more like useful tools. Which is why it is alarming that the language in Fifty Shades of Feminism is overwhelmingly more about individual aspiration — a dozen writers complaining about their difficulty in “moving up the ladder” at work, and so on — than about creating a more compassionate society. Because that could have been the goal of the removal of hierarchy, a society that is not structured around power but around empathy and compassion. A world based not around “I got mine” but around “We have ours.”

Jessa Crispin says some really important and articulate things here, about the problems feminism runs into when it tries to make individualistic power victories out to be deep and meaningful parts of a greater political movement. 

Yeah, I’m really not interested in what anyone has to say about Fifty Shades of Grey anymore. (Or ever, for that matter, except for this, which you should read if you haven’t.) But reading Crispin’s piece last week, I felt that she managed to put into words a lot of things I wished I could have, but hadn’t. (To be fair, the best parts aren’t actually about Fifty Shades of Grey.) I wanted to say something more eloquent, but I’ll stick to this: it’s smart, go check it out.

Tagged: feminismJessa CrispinLA Review of Books

24th July 2014

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It has been a really weird and sad day in a lot of ways, so I am listening to Janis Joplin because that is what I have been doing over the last twelve years of my life. One of the things that is strange about having listened to someone’s music consistently over an extended time in my life—not to get into, at least not now, exactly what those times have been—is that what moves me most changes so much. Over the last year or so, “Me and Bobby McGee”—I song I had always like well enough—has made me cry. By cry I don’t mean get thoughtfully teary-eyed: I mean, I sob loudly, alone in my apartment, and I don’t know why.

Anyway, tonight I am writing emails to people I haven’t seen in years and telling them that I’m grateful I met them, and crying, and the one thing right now that I am sure thirteen-year-old Blake and now-Blake have in common in is that we would defend Janis Joplin pretty much to the death.

23rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from LUX LITERARY MAGAZINE with 5 notes

bardlux:

Moby Dick

What is happening here, exactly?

bardlux:

Moby Dick

What is happening here, exactly?

23rd July 2014

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Not to insult 13 year-old-boys.

23rd July 2014

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Unpopular Opinions

Listening to Leonard Cohen is actually like listening to 50+ years of a 13-year-old-boy saying, “This one time I was fucking this chick and it was like, really a religious experience, man.”

Tagged: not sorrynever sorryI will never like him.Please stop

23rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from I cut so much you thought I was a dj with 48,146 notes

honeychurch:

Seamus Heaney’s last words: ”Don’t be afraid” (Noli timere), painted by Dublin artist Maser

honeychurch:

Seamus Heaney’s last words: ”Don’t be afraid” (Noli timere), painted by Dublin artist Maser

Source: honeychurch

23rd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from I cut so much you thought I was a dj with 1,214 notes

arstekne:

Apollo and Daphne (1622-25) by Gianlorenzo Bernini

I just realized that this is yet another story of how terrifying trees seem, in a way.

Tagged: Apollo and Daphnestoriestrees

Source: arstekne